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Book Club

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – November

I follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can join the informal book club by sharing your own list in the comments!

November Book Club for Business

What I read in October

Whew! I read quite a bit this month (thanks to all that time in airports + the following Introvert Recovery days).

My favorites:

The good:

  • I got a good start on the ginormous Steve Jobs biography but had to return it to the library about halfway through (he's just made Toy Story with Pixar!). Whenever it comes back in, I'll pick it up again.
  • Turning Pro was fantastically inspiring. I'll probably be writing more about it soon, in the style of this book review.
  • Someday, Someday Maybe. Lauren Graham's novel is funny and tender, and felt a lot like being in my early 20's. Fun + quick!

The meh:

  • The Culture Code. This was interesting, if a bit reductionist. All the same, it helped me understand a little more about what drives people's buying decisions.

November's To Read List

  • I already slurped up Erika Lyremark's smart book on the 2nd day of the month! It is a collection of her stories from stripping (yes!) which she transforms into business lessons you can apply to your own work. So inspiring, I read it in one day (and came up with a whole new offering!) Best yet, you can download it free when you join her list!
  • A carry-over from last month's list, I'm hoping to get to Shawn Achor's second book soon!
  • Wool is the mega-successful self-published sci-fi novel. I've been hearing about it forever and I just started it last night. Gotta read anything with “Wool” in the title, right?!
  • If You Want to Write, by Brenda Ueland is one of my all-time favorite books. I checked it out again to get me through NaNoWriMo.
  • Wired for Story is another writing-fuel book.
  • Allegiant is the third book in the Divergent trilogy and I am on pins + needles waiting for this book to come in for me at the library!

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of October?

Disclaimer-y Disclaimer! Srini sent me Turning Pro + Erika gifted Think Like A Stripper. But I’m not in any way coerced into saying nice things. Or course I’m biased when my friends write a book, but I don’t mention things I don’t like. Read the usual disclaimer here.

 

6 thoughts on the New Domesticity

 

6 thoughts on the new domesticity

This weekend I read Homeward Bound: Why Women are Embracing the New Domesticity, and the short version is: I liked it! It knits together some threads of our current culture that I hadn't really put together – the rise of: “handmade”, lifestyle blogs, Etsy, foodie culture (organic, homemade, free range), and attachment parenting and contextualizes them in the economic reality my generation of college-educated, woefully underemployeed peers experience.
Here are some of my thoughts as I read:

1. This book is not about an individual lifestyle, but about a cultural phenomenon.  I had to remind myself of this a few times because it's odd to read the very first book about my generation and the movement I've been a part my entire adulthood. It's odd to find that it's not just my little underground society of makers – but it's a huge sociological shift. Not everyone interviewed is representative of myself or the makers I work with…but it's not about me. It's about the bigger picture, and the author really does a great job of painting the bigger picture, covering massively successful bloggers and I've-never-sold-a-thing Etsyians, homesteaders and attachment moms.

 

2. Lifestyle blogs featuring domestic pursuits + the success of some Etsyians set wildly unrealistic expectations. From the jewelry artist who lists a few things on Etsy and is disappointed when nothing sells, to the blogger who thinks she can run a profitable business while “staying home” with the kids, to all of us who look at the perfectly appointed (and clean!) homes and the massively prolific quilters, knitters and writers and think “I'm just not doing enough!” – the internet is warping idea of what real people DO and what we SHOULD be doing.

This bums me out because it takes something that some people are genuinely passionate about and turns it into a measuring stick for other women, who have no interest in it. I want to hug you all and encourage you to follow the thing the makes YOU happiest – if that's Thai takeout + marathon quilting sessions – go for it! If it's home-crafted meals (and no time to craft) – go for it! The bloggers you love, and small business you admire are NOT doing it all (trust me, I've seen their houses) – so you don't need to either.

(I've written more about this here and here.)

3. “The importance of financial independence often seems to get lost in our eagerness to ditch our boring jobs or pursue our passions.”

I was thinking this over and over as I read stories of women who left the workforce to pursue homesteading or housewifery (their word!), so I was delighted to read the author state it plainly in the last chapter. Being raised by a single mom and spending years as the unintentional “breadwinner” in the family (yes, even after quitting my boring job), I can not stress how important financial independence is for everyone (men and women!). Your spouse is an absolute gem, but what will happen if they (or you, if you're the bigger earner) get hit by a truck tomorrow? What if he gets downsized? Do you have the skills to care for yourself and your family for the next 4 decades?

I am deeply devoted to helping artists, makers and writers create financial independence for themselves. This is why I focus on defining success, creating plans, and building a sustainable business (one that you can keep doing for years). It's not enough for you to quit your day job or do what you love, you have to be able to keep doing it, no matter what life throws at you. (And having a traditional job is a fantastic way to keep that kind of security, while you build something else.)

4. “Opting out” of having a career is NOT the same as opting out of the traditional workplace. I was disappointed that the author seemed (especially in the blogging and Etsy chapters) to conflate the two. Just because you leave an office job doesn't mean you can't build a career for yourself. In fact, it's what I've spent the last four years doing – building a career as a teacher and a writer. This would be impossible in a traditional job given my French degree and the options available in my small Southern town.

5. Thus, being a “stay at home mom” is vastly different than being a “work at home mom.” Some mommy bloggers and certainly Etsy's messaging pretends that it's all the same thing, and that building a bill-paying blog or business can be done easily during nap times. This is another one of those unrealistic expectations. I'm not saying you can't build a business that allows you to spend more time with your kids, only that the two require prioritizing two different sets of tasks. And depending on the age + needs of your kids, the age + needs of your business, you'll choose one over the other at different times. (In other words, you may get childcare help, or choose to build your business slower).
You're not a failure for doing so. In fact, all of the successful bloggers and business you admire are doing the same thing. The book refers to Dooce as a “stay at home mom”, but she's quite clear that she works full-time, in an office in her own home. I love this post, from a mommy blogger who comes clean about the help she has in order to work full-time.

This issue comes up a lot when I lead Pay Yourself  – women take a good look at their profitability and their scale and then they spot what needs to change, or what they prefer to prioritize (sometimes it means they stop building their craft business, and they find something else that suits their family situation better).

6. The food you cook, the home you decorate, the way you parent, the job you do, the passion you follow – it is not a measure of your moral worth. {Click to tweet this!}

I want to tattoo that on your forehead. Don't let society, even a DIY-celebrating society, tell you have to do something to conform – whether it's shopping at Wal-Mart + eating meat or it's shopping at the farmer's market + being vegan. Choose your own definition for success for your family and focus on that. Let yourself obsess (in the fun way!) over what you care most about and give yourself a free pass on doing everything else.

 

In case you're curious, my own brand of New Domesticity looks something like the picture above: I knit + watch TV or read while my husband prepares massively fancy vegan dinners (check 'em out on Instagram)…on the weekends.  I quilt while he watches baseball. Jay does all the grocery shopping, and I do most of the dish-washing. We split all other domestic chores, usually on Friday nights (literally: I make a list of everything that has to be done and we each pick half of the things on the list). If it's not Friday, the house is as messy as it is. I bake when the urge strikes.

We both work full-time, Monday – Friday, 8:30-4:30. (I could work whenever, but this is when I work best and it gives us weekends and evenings together.) We eat a lot of weeknight dinners of bean dip or spaghetti (store-bought sauce + noodles, maybe with homemade vegan “meatballs”) or homemade veggie burgers.

If I were defining our Ideal Domestiticity it would value equality – in housework and in passion-following and in financial decision-making. We value small and local over big and corporate, but we get nearly all of our clothes from Target. We value homemade but we equally value rest and time to pursue hobbies…so if “homemade” means hours of unpleasant work, forget it. (This shifts on a daily basis. Sometimes homemade pie crust sounds like fun, and sometimes it sounds like torture.) And above all, we remind ourselves (ok, I ask Jay to remind me) that our choices in the domestic sphere do not indicate our worth as humans. 

 

 

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – October

I follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. I'd love to hear about your books – please share your own list in the comments!

Writing about this month's reads today. Stack # 1!

What I read in September

 

Stephanie’s new novel, Removed, is so so good. I can't believe I have to wait for book #2! Totally addictive!
Use What You’ve Got is a funny mix of personal stories-turned-into-business advice. Hilarious and encouraging, even if you're not a real estate mogul!

After watching (and loving) Shawn Achor's TED talk, I put the Happiness Advantage on my list..and I was not disappointed. I've got a whole post on why you're going to love this book (coming soon!), but if you can't wait, listen to Shawn's great BlogcastFM interview!

Writing about reading while working at the library. #meta (Full list on the blog - link in profile!)

October's To Read List

Since the first part of the month required a lot of airplane-time and thinky-thinking (4 live workshops in 8 days!), I've got more novels than usual on my list (and am so happy about that!)

  • Where'd You Go, Bernadette? Recommended by just about everyone, this was the perfect airplane read!
  • Someday, Someday Maybe. Lorelai wrote a book! Ok, so her name is really Lauren Graham, but she'll always be Lorelai of Gilmore Girls to me! (If you haven't watched Parenthood yet, you totally should. It is so much better than I expected!)
  • Grounded, by friend and Starship Captain Heather Ordover. I started this back in September and can't wait to finish it. You can order yours here + get your kit (yarn + pattern) here. (Riin + Heather met + collaborated thanks to the Starship. YAY!)
  • I liked the Happiness Advantage so much, I added Shawn's second book to my list!
  • The Culture Code
  • Turning Pro was a thank you gift from Srini + it's perfectly purse-sized. I've been reading it in little blips of time (the chapters are tiny + perfect for bite-size reading) and I already love it!
  • Steve Jobs has been on my list forever and it finally came in for me at the library.
  • The Art of Being Unmistakable, by Srinivas Rao.

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of September?

 


Disclaimer-y Disclaimer! I was given a free copy of Stephanie’s book + Srini sent me Turning Pro. But I’m not in any way coerced into saying nice things. Or course I’m biased when my friends write a book, but I don’t mention things I don’t like. (I bought Heather’s book.) Read the usual disclaimer here.

 

 

The Adventures

Every day is an adventure. I share the view, the gratitude and the finds on Fridays, and you’re invited to join in.
You can find all my adventures here, or follow along via email here.

The View

Breakfast in bed with @spajonas's book. #perfectweekend
Cutting fabric for a new, secret-ish quilts.
Yay! My @alex_franzen print fits perfectly! #abovethecouch  (Frame still needed. Yes, I used washi tale to keep it up for now)
Charbroiled butternut + black bean rancheros. Yum. #whatveganseat #vegan

 

 

I am so grateful* for:

  • Butternut rancheros. Yum!
  • Random gchats with Ana.
  • Clarity around integrity (and the bravery to make changes).
  • The stories that current Starship Captains have sent  me! Inspiring and humbling, I'm so happy to be a part of their journey! (Stories are shared here.)
  • The editing power of Jess. She radically improved everything I sent this week!
  • Excellent questions from future Starship Captains. (You can find my answers here.) This is the most exciting time – when everyone's about to beam aboard!
  • My new star sweater.
  • That at home feeling.

 

 

The finds:

 

*My gratitude list is a new part of the Adventures. Join me in listing what you're grateful for!

6 reasons I love Quilting Happiness

I've “read” a lot of quilting books. Most provide beautiful inspiration, and that's really all I need out of them. I flip through, peruse the instructions, and enjoy the pictures.
Yay!! @craftypod's new book just arrived! I'm going to save it for an after-dinner treat :)

That's all I was looking for when I bought Quilting Happiness. (Honestly, I bought it because I like Diane so much!) But it completely surprised me with several things that I haven't found in any other books, that are perfect for a new (ish) quilter:

1. The patterns don't just tell you how much fabric you need, but also how to cut it. This is one of the things that slows me down more than anything, so I really appreciated it!

Love Quilting Happiness!

 

2. Squaring up your fabric instructions! I've never found theses instructions any where else, and they've already changed my quilting life. (I feel kind of dense that I didn't know this before.)

Love Quilting Happiness!

 

3. “Squaring the block” instructions! Ok, I knew to do this, but the book gives a much better way of doing this than I was. Love it!Love Quilting Happiness!

 

4. A clear explanation of sewing together curved pieces. I've been avoiding it for a long time because I couldn't wrap my head around it…but this book made it make sense!

Love Quilting Happiness!

5. Creativity exercises. Thanks to this book, I started a quilting journal, and now have a place to keep all my ideas and plans. I've already used it to buy fabric for my newest quilt!

6. A sense of humor!

Love Quilting Happiness!

(You just have to read any book that mentions hand quilting while watching Dr. Who – it's one of my favorite past times!)

What do you look for in a quilting book?

 

Not a quilter? For your dose of Diane-smartness, check out the workbook we co-created: Craft an Effective Blog (or get it free inside the Starship.)

cross_stitches

 

(I'm trying something new with this listy review. I've wanted to review more books, for a long time, but I get stuck in writing about what I like. So I'm experimenting with a format that's easy and straightforward. Like it? Wish I said more (or less?) Let me know!)
See the usual Disclaimer here! 

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – September

follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I’ll share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can share your list of books in the comments, or we can talk about any of the books that you want to read along with me.

Sharing my September reading list on the site today (link in profile)! What are you reading?

 

What I read in August

I was completely, unexpectedly delighted by Start. This book says all of the things that I tell people who want to craft their dream business: Just Start. Make a map. Experiment! If you're feeling stuck or just not sure what to do next in your business or dream, read this book

Another BIG winner this month was Diane’s Quilting Happiness. I'll have a full review later this week, but for now I'll just tell you – go buy this book! It's great!

Maya Angelou's Mom & Me & Mom was short and sweet and full of her inimitable prose. A lovely read.

I read Dad is Fat in a day. Hilarious (although I recognized quite a few of the “essays” from Gaffigan's stand-up routine…which I love.) If you don't know who this guy is, his two recent specials are on Netflix. (Jay thinks he must be a long-lost older brother. His sense of humor is just SO me…and we're both frighteningly pale.)

 

(And there were more, but not worth talking about. You can find all the books I read onGoodReads)

 

 

September's To Read List

 

  • The local book club picked Boy's Life. I have no idea if I'll like it, but I want to join the group, so I'm going to try it!
  • After watching (and loving) this video (and using it in Explore You), I've been meaning to read Shawn's book!
  • Heather wrote a book! With a knitter in it! (She shared it with the Starship, so I got an early copy.) You can pre-order yours here.

 

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of August?

 


Disclaimer-y Disclaimer! I was given a free copy of Stephanie’s book. But I’m not in any way coerced into saying nice things. Or course I’m biased when my friends write a book, but I don’t mention things I don’t like.  (I bought Heather + Diane’s book.) Read the usual disclaimer here. 

 

 

 

 

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – August

follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I’ll share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can share your list of books in the comments, or we can talk about any of the books that you want to read along with me.
A peek at this month's To Read list (more on blog). #reading

 

What I read in July

Ocean at the End of The Lane  – Beautiful and mysterious and exactly what I expected from Neil Gaiman. (If you haven't yet, go and read all of his books. Right now.)
I started The Woman Upstairs and decided not to finish it. I just didn't like the narrator at all, and when I found myself avoiding it, I remembered: I believe in quitting! Why spend more time with someone you don't like?

(And there were more, but not worth talking about. You can find all the books I read on GoodReads)

Still reading…


I love love Annie Dillard's The Writing Life and I'm taking it nice and slow (and occasionally posting quotes on Instagram).

I'm also taking the Declaration of You slowly. It's my feeling-stuck un-sticker during my workday!

 

August's To Read List

  • We were talking about money and our relationship with it in the Starship (and I was gushing over how much I like You Need a Budget) and a captain recommended Your Money Or Your Life. Even though I'm feeling pretty great (for the first time in my life!) with how I'm managing things, I'm reading this book as research, so I have something good to recommend when people ask (I usually recommend Ramit Sethi's book (automation!) and this Dave Ramsey book (debt reduction!)).

 

  • Jay and I used to send funny posts by Jon Acuff to each other all the time, so when I saw Start at the library I snatched it up. “Punch Fear in the Face?” Um, ok! Probably another book to recommend to explorers.

 

  • I also picked up Making Good on a whim. After deciding to donate 10% of sales to Al's Obliteride, I've been thinking more about integrating  philanthropy a part of my business. I've been giving $25 in Kiva loans (to help other tiny businesses!) for every Starship captain, and I'd like to be more comfortable talking about it. (I know I don't do a great job, because, well, I've been tithing my income my whole life and was taught not to talk about it…so I'm looking for a way to make doing good integral to what we're doing here, without feeling showy.)

And..there's a pile of books my friends wrote, that are filling up my Kindle:

  • Do Nothing, Get Rich – a parody of the “get rich” books, written by my uncle (his name is not Moneylicious)! He's funny + smart, so I'm looking forward to reading it.
  • Amy's novel! I've been feeling fiction-less and adrift since giving up The Woman Upstairs, so I'm looking forward to something fun!
  • Stephanie's not-quite-released yet novel. (I'm an early reader! Yay!) Watch her space for updates!
  • Diane's book comes out August 27th! If you like quilting and self-discovery (which are, like, my two most-favorite things ever), I think we're gonna love this book. I can't wait for my copy to arrive (pre-order yours here!)

 

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of July?


Disclaimer-y Disclaimer! I was given a free copy of my uncle's book and Stephanie's. But I'm not in any way coerced into saying nice things, or even mentioning them. Or course I'm biased when my friends write a book, but I don't mention things I don't like.  (I bought Amy + Diane's book.) Read the usual disclaimer here. 

 

 

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – July!

follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I’ll share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can share your list of books in the comments, or we can talk about any of the books that you want to read along with me.
Sharing my July book list on the blog! #linkinprofile #reading

What I read in June

I can't believe I hadn't read The Handmaid's Tale before now. I was amazed by how modern this story of a distopian future felt (right in line with the Hunger Games and Divergent, with a young female narrator navigating a not-so-distant future). If you think much about women's rights, this book will delight (and frighten) you.

Just like Divergent, I gulped down Insurgent in one weekend. Fun and face-paced, I can't wait for the final part of the series!

I was super-honored to be an early reader for my friend Kyeli's new book about loss and motherhood, Time and Again. If you've ever struggled with fertility or wanted to save your younger self, you'll enjoy it! (Crying alert! I bawled my eyes out!)

Also read:
The Great Gatsby
Loving What Is
WomanCode 

 

July's To Read List

 

(For more reading inspiration, visit the comments of June'sMay'sApril's, and March's book club.)

 

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of June?

 

 


Please note! I’m an affiliate for Amazon, which means I get book money if you buy through the links I’ve used here. (So far, I've earned enough for half of a book, or one grande soy latte.) GoodReads is a free tool for tracking what you read. I read all of these books via my library, which I strongly recommend!

Explorer Club of Book Lovers – June

I follow my enthusiasm by reading…a lot. And once a month, I’ll share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can share your list of books in the comments, or we can talk about any of the books that you want to read along with me.

June's reading list. More books &  info today at TaraSwiger.com

This was a weird reading month, because I had whole, uninterrupted days to read (yay!), followed by a long week with my visiting brother (love him!), where I didn't pick a book for several days (so weird!).

Here's what I read, from May's list:

I swallowed Divergent in one glorious weekend gulp. Completely fun and engaging. I have Insurgent on the list for this

Contagious was a great investigation of what makes things (any thing!) spread and become known. The author studies (and develops a kind of equation) what I was trying to express in my book, in the section on making your work shareable. If you want to increase the sharability of your work, I highly recommend this book.

Lean In was much better than I expected. I wrote a review of it on GoodReads that sparked some Twitter conversation. The short version: A woman's work life is influenced by a number of things, many of which are under the surface and out of view (social and cultural norms). By bringing these influences to the surface, Sandberg wants to make it easier for you to make a real decision, with all of the facts in front of you. She's not on one side or the other of the mommy wars (and neither am), she just wants to talk about your options. When (if?) I have kids, I'll be talking about my own choices honestly with ya'll, and I look forward to exploring the range of experiences we have in our community.
(If you want a book to reaffirm your decision to work after children, The Feminine Mistake comes down pretty hard on that side. I read it 6 years ago, so I'm a little fuzzy on it, but I remember liking it. If you're choosing another way, you'll probably want to avoid it.)

(I also read The Paris Wife and Tattoos on the Heart, both great!)

June's To Read List

The list is a bit shorter this month, because I'm hanging out for a week my littlest brothers (12 + 14) and I'm spending a week at the beach with my extended family. If I learned anything last month, it's that I really can't pick up a think-y book after a day of interaction. (For more on my introvert needs, read Quiet)

  • The Great Gatsby – yes, I read it in High School, but Jay didn't, so we're both reading it this summer. I'm excited to talk about it with him! (on GoodReads, also on Craftlit – which I recommend if you wanna sound supersmart)
  • Insurgent – because Divergent was fun! (on Goodreads)
  • Paradox of Choice – I often suggest that Captains strip their offerings down to few choices…and this book has the science on why.
  • A Walk in the Woods – we've been exploring bits of the Appalachian Trail near us, so I'm looking to reading more about it. (For a lovely tail of long-trail hiking, you can't beat Wild.)

(For more reading inspiration, visit the comments of May's, April's, and March's book club.)

What are you reading this month?

What was your favorite book of May?

 

 

 


Please note! I’m an affiliate for Amazon, which means I get book money if you buy through the links I’ve used here. (So far, I've earned enough for half of a book, or one grande soy latte.) GoodReads is a free tool for tracking what you read. I read all of these books via my library, which I strongly recommend!

 

 

Explorer’s Club of Book Lovers – May

Hello book lovers! It's time for the book club, but let's change it up!

Last month I picked two books, but we didn't have nearly as much participation as the month before, and I think I know why. Two books is just way too limiting, isn't it?  I read a few at once, and I'm a fan of quitting whenever I want. So instead of just  picking 2 books for us to read and discuss together, let's just make this a space to talk about everything we're reading.

I'll share (some of) the books I read last month and the books I intend to read this month. You can share your list of books in the comments, or we can talk about any of the books that you want to read along with me.

April's Reads

Icarus Deception. 

Amazon | IndieBound | GoodReads

This book was a big YES to everything I feel about my own creative business, and the way I encourage creatives in their own. It directly inspired this post about the Only Work You Have to Do, whose discussion led to this one on connection…which led to these two posts about creating a path of connection for your customer.

 

Market Yourself.

Amazon | Goodreads

Yes, I spent a good chunk of last week re-reading my own book, to prepare for teaching a workshop on Artist's Portfolios + Social Media. The timing was perfect since Saturday was my Book-iversary! The book launched one year ago! (You can get a signed one here.)

Sunday Morning Quilts

Amazon | IndieBound | GoodReads

I read a lot of quilt books last month, but this was by far the best – both in the I-would-make-that quality of the patterns and in the friendly, chatty beginning.

 

May's To Read List 

This month's reading list. Details are on the site.

I had intended to read Contagious last month…but I had to return it to the library (someone else had a hold on it) before I got to it. But it's all mine now, and I'm one chapter in. What makes this book different from all the other ones about business and social media is that it is well-researched by the author.

You Can't Make This Stuff Up is all about creative nonfiction. What it is, how to write it, and exercises to get you started. Since creative nonfiction is the best definition I can find for what I write, and I'm working on a new project, I'm super excited to read this.

After hearing Father Boyle on On Being with Krista Tippet, I wanted to read his book.  I strongly recommend the recording of their conversation. It's funny, heart-breaking, and is the very best I can hope for my faith.

Lean In. Eh, I'm requested this book from the library because I'm curious about what it says to women in the workforce. I've seen a lot of entrepreneurial types saying “You don't need to “lean in” because you should start your own business!“…but while I'd love for everyone to do exactly what they love, I know that's not a choice everyone has, in every situation. Until I read this, I'm not recommending it, because it has the potential to be completely annoying.

Last week my 14 year old brother called me up to say, “I just finished Divergent. It is BETTER than the Hunger Games. You have  to read it.”  We're going on a family vacation at the end of June, and since 14 year old boys are notoriously hard to have conversations with (without stabbing out my own eyes), I hope to be caught up with where he is in the series so we can talk about it. (Yes, I take recommendations from everyone. And I know we have similar taste (in movies and books, if not in video games.))

 

I’m an affiliate for Amazon + IndieBound, which means I get soy latte money if you buy through the links I’ve used here. GoodReads is a free tool for tracking what you read.  I  read all these books via my library, which I strongly recommend!

 

What are you reading? 

 

 

 

 

 

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